Remove this ad

Lead

Jan 7 13 2:15 PM

Tags : :


Drawing with tracing paper or transparencies enables you to build up layers of drawings, and gives you the freedom to discard certain layers if you feel like starting a challenging part over without losing all your previous work. If you have access to tracing paper or transparencies, try focusing on observing one type of bird at your feeder. Begin by drawing the basic bird shapes, angles and posture on the first sheet. Place a second sheet on top of the first, begin to refine the image by lightly drawing the silhouette and form of the bird. Place a third sheet over the second and block out the major areas of dark and light values. On the fourth sheet, add the eyes, beak, wings, tail, feathers and other details. 

Upload your sketches here. See examples from Beck attached.






Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Remove this ad
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#1 [url]

Jan 10 13 9:44 PM

Following a suggestion that I add color to an activity, I used prismacolor pencils for the tracing paper exercise. On the third layer I was not pleased with the beak and was able to make changes when drawing the fourth layer.






Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   

#2 [url]

Jan 12 13 6:42 PM

So this is three layers of tracing paper?  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

Quote    Reply   

#3 [url]

Jan 14 13 1:47 PM

@lyn -- How'd you like this activity?  Do you think you'll revisit it in your other drawings?  I ask because I really liked it and have already used it for another non-Feedersketch drawing.

Beck

Quote    Reply   

#5 [url]

Jan 15 13 3:06 PM

@lyn -- I know the sketchbook project! That's so cool that you're doing it.  Can you reattach the image? It didn't come through for me and I'd love to see how you're doing an atlas of your block. 

Quote    Reply   
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#6 [url]

Jan 15 13 8:08 PM

Beck,
For the Atlas, I drew a plan of the block, to scale, with the dwellings, trees and feeders. I photographed each house, and recorded the type and location of all the trees. In the fall I collected leaves from each type of tree. Using the house elevations for reference, I used tracing paper to sketch each fascade at a common scale (I eye-balled foundation, floor and roof heights). I used a common curb line on all the pages.Then using graphite on the reverse of the sketches I transferred the images to the sketchbook. The finished work is black roller ball pen, pencil and watercolor.  Each pair of pages shows a house, the names we use to identify the property, a list of trees, a few special features, and a full size leaf from one of the neighborhood trees.




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#7 [url]

Jan 16 13 11:50 AM

Lyn! 
I'm standing up and clapping in my cubical.  I loved more than anything that first sketch with the finder lines.  It's amazing to see your progress in seeing space! 

How did you like doing this process?  I do it with my scientific illustration classes here with the science Museum of MN - and I find the students (ages 8-12), are really astounded by the sense of depth by adding layers of lines, textures, and color. 

What was you're experience?

I'm DIEING for the free time to get this step done.  (*Getting ready for 3D foundations to start at MCAD.. I'm in a sea of syllabi right now)

It's a great day to make things. abbiaallan.com/home.html

Quote    Reply   

#8 [url]

Jan 16 13 6:34 PM

That is really neat.  My husband just was looking with me and said it is a bit like autobaun journal.  Have to had a chance to see that live.  I caught it last year on a visit to NC.  also have seen many movies on it.   Also it reminded me of google earth or zillow when looking at houses for realestate or neighborhood studies.  Thank you so much for the share.  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

Quote    Reply   

#9 [url]

Jan 17 13 10:15 AM

@lyn -- INCREDIBLE.  Seriously awesome idea and brilliantly executed. I'm standing up and clapping right alongside aallan. Is this for this year's project or is it already sent in?  I want to make sure I get the ID number so that if I ever have the chance to see the library, I check yours out.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#10 [url]

Jan 17 13 2:22 PM

I'll send you the ID number when it is assigned....sketchbooks had to be in the mail on Tuesday this week....I painted to the deadline !  The past weeks of drawing for FeederSketch warmed up the hand and eye for my Atlas project. Great Fun !

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   

#11 [url]

Jan 20 13 5:07 PM

Wow, that's an awesome atkas, lyn!!  I've never heard of the sketchbook project--very cool!


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

Quote    Reply   

#12 [url]

Jan 23 13 10:48 AM

Here's my attempt to capture a pigeon's launch from memory using tracing paper (I liked my initial impression better than the corrected version), and then a more accurate sketch using a photograph.

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods


Click here to view the attachment

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help