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Jan 7 13 1:37 PM

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Take a visit to your local natural history or science museum to sketch the anatomy of a bird. Inside those circles and ovals we’ve been drawing is the underlying structure that allows birds to stand, fly, run, and roost. Share photographs and sketches of what you see here.

Upload your sketches here. See examples from Wendy, a co-worker of Elizabeth and Beck's, and Margaret attached. 



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lyn

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#1 [url]

Jan 7 13 4:25 PM

feedersketch, do you have any alternate suggestions for this exercise and the bird skins for those of us who don't live near a museum, university or other facility with bird skeletons......

maybe this is an opportunity to have roast duck (it would be headless and legless because there isn't even a Chinese poulty shop in the area.)

and I won't wish for a fatal window strike, but if it happens in the future, I'll see the opportunity provided by the bird's misfortune.

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

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#2 [url]

Jan 7 13 5:58 PM

You are all great sketchers, But I am really having a problem with this part.  I like my birds fully featherd.  :)   Ginny H>  

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#6 [url]

Jan 9 13 11:46 AM

I found the following details surprising:

- the location of the hinge for birds' jaws -- rather than at the back of the bill, it's way back in the head.  I read that in the John Muir Laws book too.

- the large keel-shaped breast bone for the attachment of the wing muscles -- it's such a significant portion of the skeleton

- that, often the bird's skull appears so small compared with the skeleton -- especially for the turkey with its relatively massive body.  Of course, this applies to dog and cat skeletons I've seen as well.  But human skulls appear to be relatively larger, in proportion to the body.  The proportions do vary on the age of the human. 

- long length of the bird's neck and number of vertebrae.  I understand that greater number of vertebrae bestow the gift of greater mobility of the head.

- relatively stubby arms.  Long primary feathers fool my brain into thinking that there is a bone way out there at the wingtip, when in reality the "thumb" lands at the division between primary and secondary feathers and the "fingers" stop maybe halfway out to the tips of the primary segment of the wings.  In Wendy's sketch the arms are extended; however, in the chicken and turkey skeletons I've seen, the arms are drawn towards the body -- the way that these types of birds naturally hold their wings.

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods

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#7 [url]

Jan 9 13 1:35 PM



@lyn, No Chinese Poultry shops or natural history museums around, don't despair! Check out this awesome website, it allows you to look at the skeletons of various types of birds, rotate them, and zoom in!
I can imagine drawing from a 3D model on a computer screen isn't the same as drawing from the real thing but let me know what you think of the site and the drawing experience.

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#8 [url]

Jan 9 13 2:50 PM

Wow Margaret what a sight.  I have errands and then I am gonna try one of those.  Thanks.  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#9 [url]

Jan 9 13 3:04 PM

Even though I work at a science museum, I actually don't have access to a bird skeleton either, so I plan to do this activity using this website as well, and will post what I come up with in the next few days. Thanks for sharing, Margaret! 

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#11 [url]

Jan 16 13 10:41 AM

I'm still working from photos at the moment.  Honesty factor. 
No time outside of work to get to an awesome skeleton... 

One is a "loose rendering"   of a crow, with the ink from another image coming through the other side. 
the 2nd is from a photo i found of a baby bird with some of it's feathers still attached. It was all crumpled over, and since it's January and I become completely depressed during this gray month, I decided to give him a little something - well, just sweeten him up a bit. 

I'm also watching a friend go through cancer treatment.... maybe it's a little protector for him. I'm not sure. 

breaking the rules... again.



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It's a great day to make things. abbiaallan.com/home.html

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#12 [url]

Jan 17 13 1:49 AM

I enjoy yours cause i can not do the bone thing.  Sorry your friend is going through that it is hard to watch but great to have friends at that time.  ginny H 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#13 [url]

Jan 20 13 5:37 PM

Your little angel is sweet, aallan.  Ginny is right--you're a good friend for being there in hard times!


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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