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#21 [url]

Jan 14 13 1:44 PM

I love this idea. 

Sometimes I sketch to remember things -- birds right now, but also memories of trips like this one:


Other times I sketch to explain things to others, like this diagram of the four eras of computing:

Ever since reading the Zen of Seeing in prep for this project, I've started to sketch as an observational activity. Here's the first drawing I did that I looked down in amazement at what I'd seen. It is of a friend who was sitting beside me, also drawing.

And more recently, I've begun to play with watercolor. My current favorite is a drawing I made while on Primrose Hill in London. 

I think mostly, I sketch to express what's in my head (either what it's processing or wanting to communicate) in ways that words can't express.  I also encourage others to sketch because I see it as a pretty innocuous way to take a creative risk and I think creative risk-taking is something generally good for humans to do.  

Beck

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#22 [url]

Jan 16 13 1:13 PM

Hi

I know you can buy them from North Carolina Biological supply:

http://www.carolina.com/life-science/anatomical-models-skeletons/animal-models-skeletons/10349.ct?mCat=10337&sCat=10347&ssCat=&_DARGS=/catalog/gadgets/results-navigation.jsp.pageSizeForm

I think this link will bring you to the skeleton section.  If you want to assemble it you want a disarticulated skeleton.
Otherwise, there are ways of making your own.  My boyfriend gave me a dead finch once, (*he knows how I love biology, so it's not as weird as it sounds).  I put it in a tupper-wear outside and let the beetles, maggots etc do their work.  In the winter when they beetles died, I used hydrogen peroxide, a a little watered down bleach and over time got the very delicate skeleton clean.  I haven't glued the parts together because they are so tiny.

Wear gloves and a mask when handling of course at all times...  but that's the DYI way of making your own skeleton.


It's a great day to make things. abbiaallan.com/home.html

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#24 [url]

Jan 16 13 6:08 PM

Love the two people on the bench.  When people share bird photo's we can click on them and make larger.  I was trying to do this with your photo's of sketches and water colors but it did not work the same.  I kind of wanted to climb into the bench and see that whole view.  thanks for sharing just lovely ways to remember.  I always tell my kids to stop and make a memory.  So great you can paint or sketch a memory.  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#25 [url]

Jan 17 13 10:24 AM

Thanks @aallan and @hutchgigi.  You can go here to see larger pictures of the bench drawing and actual photos, too.  And here are links to the others: 8039763658_bbe6a7cc2d_b.jpg5057468828_2b180faaf3_b.jpg and 4410936220_393748cabb_b.jpg

@aallan -- How long did you have to leave the finch outside?

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#26 [url]

Jan 20 13 5:17 PM

Love all the sketches and all the reasons to draw!  Beck, your face and bench drawings are lovely!

I think I can answer your question to aallan--you leave it out as long as necessary (i.e., till it stops stinking!    Am I right, aallan? heheh) 

That's a great idea, though.  I'll have to keep my eye out for dead birds....sort of difficult here unless they're window strikes cuz they get eaten so fast.  We're up to our eyeballs in scavangers and predators...



West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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#27 [url]

Jan 21 13 2:55 PM

Abbi,

Do you have a suggestion on the type of glue you'll use to assemble your little finch?  I'm starting to assemble bones from my Costco rotisserie chicken, photographing each section so that I can assemble the puzzle pieces following cleaning by boiling into chicken soup.  Even if I only get some sections together, these will be useful in future studies.  What happens to the cartilage over time or after boiling?

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods

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#28 [url]

Jan 21 13 3:01 PM

i am lost about the finch  thing???? ginny h.  

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#29 [url]

Jan 23 13 10:33 AM

Ginny H,
 
Not to be overly gross -- but being scientists, here and in the bird bones segment, there has been some discussion about assembling one's own bird skeleton or parts -- for study when museum specimens are unavailable.  I had suggested using a rotisserie chicken, and I've started saving bones.  Abbi mentioned that her boyfriend had given her a dead finch once and that she had cleaned the skeleton; but had not yet assembled it. 
 
I'm teaching a week-long nature drawing course this summer (Chautauqua Institution, western NY state); and for models, I've been assembling several containers of nature specimens (variety of rocks, bark, seed pods and cones, coral, sea fans, shells, etc) and I'll supplement these with fresh flowers and vegetables from their Farmers Market.  If my partial bird skeleton is successful, I'll bring it as well.
 
Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods


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#30 [url]

Jan 24 13 1:25 AM

Thanks for all the info and good luck with the class.  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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