Remove this ad

Lead

Dec 24 12 11:49 AM

Tags : :


Quickly sketch a bird and indicate leading edge of wing and the boundary of the secondary feathers. Using your sketches, annotate details of wing. Draw wings from various angles (above, below, open, closed). 

Optional activity A: Create a simple linkage system to understand how the wing bones work. 

Optional activity B: Create bird model to understand foreshortening of wing tips.

Upload your sketches here. Example from Beck attached.


Click here to view the attachment
Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Remove this ad

#1 [url]

Jan 2 13 10:15 AM

Since I was drawing from bird mounts at the Science Museum's Sketch-a-thon, these are a bit more detailed than quick sketches.  And, I don't have Common Loons, Trumpeter Swans, or Pileated Woodpeckers in my back yard.
 
Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods





Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

Quote    Reply   
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#2 [url]

Jan 2 13 2:30 PM

These drawings are exquisite Greg. How wonderful to have the large bird mounts to sketch from. Great idea......I am on the hunt for a similar opportunity  in this area. 

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   
avatar

barbk

fanatic

Posts: 3,717

#3 [url]

Jan 2 13 3:03 PM

You have a gift, Greg, to be able to sketch like that.

Pray tell, are bird mounts real taxidermied (if that's a real word)  birds?


Barbara, Jersey shore, backyard 1/4 acre with mostly oak trees. 6 feeders, suet, and 2 bird baths.

Quote    Reply   

#4 [url]

Jan 2 13 5:28 PM

@glecker: Let me just say...WOW! Amazing detail in these sketches. 

I'm curious about your labeling process. Were you thinking about which part was which as you were drawing? Or did you look everything up later? And if the latter, what did you use for reference (that may be nice to include in our Annotated Bibliography)? 

Also, can anyone out there help Greg with his questions about the Tertial Feathers in these sketches?  

Quote    Reply   

#5 [url]

Jan 2 13 9:38 PM

Awesome job, Greg!! Not sure what your question is about the tertials?  They're indicated in the proper place on the wing, if that was the question? 


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

Quote    Reply   

#7 [url]

Jan 3 13 12:27 PM

Margaret,

Nice wings!  I've been thinking about boiling down a Costco rotisserie chicken and re-assembling the parts to make a partial study skeleton.  I had been concerned about putting the parts back together.  Now, between the drawings and maybe some photos of skeletons, I'm not so scared to do so.  It would be great to have a future reference.  Has anyone else ever done such a thing?  For cleaning the bones, I'm aware that museums use beetles, but I would rather use the chicken soup method.  

I hope to study the Bell Museum's turkey skeleton at tonight's Sketch Night.  Might you be attending too, Margaret?  I'm trying to better understand how animal wings and legs work -- especially understanding the comparison the bones of limbs of a primate and four legged animals and birds.  For me, the weirdest thing is the way a dog's or bird's "knee" is really their heel -- I think that's right.

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods 

Quote    Reply   

#8 [url]

Jan 3 13 12:47 PM

Barbara (Barbk),

As far as I can tell, folks use "mounts" and "taxidermy" somewhat interchangeably.  Yes, the Science Museum of MN, and the Bell Museum at the U of MN have wonderful collections of bird and animal taxidermy (or mounts). 

Elizabeth,

As I was drawing, I was thinking about Primary and Secondary feathers and their coverts since I now comprehend those parts.  I had been wanting to call coverts "coverlets" as in a bedspread since I was confounded by the somewhat negative meaning of the adjective "covert".  Now, with the help of my dictionary, I can think more positively of a bird's covert feathers as "sheltering" the quills of its wing feathers.  For the rest of the parts, I used the Laws book that was sent to me from the Week 2 drawing. There is so much detail in his book about the way feathers are attached to the various limbs of a bird, and overlap the various parts -- almost like scales -- except that birds can manipulate these so gracefully -- to fly but when perched.  Truthfully, I never thought much of how a bird's skeleton fits within its body -- especially how its neck, with its greater number of vertebrae than us primates, allows for such dexterity of movement of its head up and down.  When I'm cold, the most I can do is to scrunch up my shoulders and zip up my collar.  How wonderful it would be to be able to draw one's head in closer to one's body! 

Hazelrunmama,

I labeled the area of the what I thought would be tertials.  Without knowing what to study in detail, I was largely drawing what I saw.  Tonight I'll study the Bell Museum's dioramas to see if I can differentiate tertials and the other feathered parts from one another.

My compliments to the PFW: Sketch program for providing the opportunity to connect what I've been seeing and studying at the Bell Museum's monthly Sketch Nights for the past year with the anatomy that underlies the outer form of our feathered friends!

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, pagoda dogwoods

Quote    Reply   
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#9 [url]

Jan 3 13 12:53 PM

Margaret and Greg, what a good idea to use a chicken skeleton for sketching and anatomy lesson. 

As a maker of soups, frequently using rotisserie carcasses, I have found that the Costco chickens have been so well done that the bones are falling apart when it is eaten. 

I suggest getting a whole chicken and cooking the bird until the meat is just 'done' but the ligaments haven't disintegrated. 

Any other suggestions? 

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   

#10 [url]

Jan 3 13 3:19 PM

I love soup. And chicken. So I'm gonna do this and take pictures.  Who else? Maybe if we have a few people we could compare different sources (rotisserie vs. boiling, others?).

Beck

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad

#11 [url]

Jan 3 13 9:42 PM

I wonder if anyone makes a model skeleton for birds like they do for dinosaurs--you know, like a kid's science toy?


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

Quote    Reply   

#14 [url]

Jan 5 13 10:23 PM

411$  they want for off the shelf.   time to start boiling the chickens.  Ginny H.  

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

Quote    Reply   

#15 [url]

Jan 7 13 7:21 PM



Again I really gotta work on my patience, or like Julia said, take some advice from John Muir Laws and learn how to suggest feathers, rather than trying to draw all of them individually. 
This wing was drawn at the Bell Museum's Sketch Night. It was a wing without a body so I had to guess what type of bird it was. I was attracted to it because of the iridescent scapular feathers. (By the way, glecker without your excellent wing drawings and annotations I would have just called them "the feathers by the shoulder socket.") 


Click here to view the attachment

Quote    Reply   
avatar

lyn

superstar

Posts: 723

#16 [url]

Jan 7 13 7:42 PM

Very nice wings Phyllis and Margaret.
  I can see the iridescence in just a few gestures. 
I think if the purpose of the sketch is clear to the artist, then it helps to determine the extent of detail in the drawing. 

Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

Quote    Reply   

#17 [url]

Jan 8 13 3:33 PM


@lyn: The facilitators have been doing a ton of thinking around the question "why sketch?". We realize that sometimes people draw for themselves, sometimes for others, sometimes a little bit of both. Beyond that there can be a multitude of motivations and reasons for drawing. What have been some of the purposes or intentions behind some of your sketches? Could you share some sketches that represent different motivations/intentions? (Not necessarily just things you've done for this project, other examples would be great too.) 

I would like to invite other folks to share as well. Margaret? Phyllis? Others? 

Quote    Reply   

#18 [url]

Jan 9 13 11:57 AM

Interesting point about why we sketch.  Here are my reasons
 
- to better communicate construction of something.  As an engineer/designer, I've drawn assemblies of custom light fixtures, installation details for mounting lights to architectural members. 
 
- as a learning tool.  I probably mentioned earlier that I retain concepts that I've written down manually or drawn.
 
- illustrations for publications -- to accompany writing or as a newletter cover
 
- gifts - to share beauty with friends, families, customers
 
- for this program -- for a combination of learning and sharing
 
I'll pull together an example of each and post a small compilation of these.
 
Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, dogwoods

Quote    Reply   

#19 [url]

Jan 10 13 11:32 AM

Here are a few examples of sketches I've done for the reasons I explained above.

The eagle illustration accompanied my neighborhood newspaper article describing a St. Paul Audubon Society trip along the Mississippi River to see the Bald Eagles that gather at the southern end of Lake Pepin (an enlargement of the Mississippi River caused naturally by narrowing of the river and by deposits laid by the Chippewa River, an entering tributary.  At the southern end of the "lake", river velocity and churn maintain ice free conditions that attract a large number of Bald Eagles (and I've heard even Golden Eagles) all winter.

The other two images are of a custom light sconce we designed many years ago and of some details for architectural lighting design (my day job). 

Because I depart tomorrow for a week-long class/vacation painting plein air on Catalina Island (CA), this will likely be my last post until January 20 when I'll catch up the remaining Stage 4 activities.  I'll try to check in once in a while if I can to read everyone's posts, which are truly educational and entertaining.  Have a great week, everyone! 

Greg; Mpls, MN
Urban back yard with red and white cedars, dogwoods




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

Quote    Reply   

#20 [url]

Jan 14 13 10:01 AM

Thanks for sharing, Greg. I also wanted to share a few examples of when I sketch, other than for this program. Beck has been trying to encourage me to sketch more for years, and I think I've been gradually growing as a sketcher, but never as much as in this program. 

As an exhibit developer, my intentions behind sketching are to represent an idea conceptually/diagrammatically, trying to not rely on so many words (as is my tendency). So here are a couple examples from my sketchbook of early exhibit prototype ideas -- as you can see, there are still a lot of surrounding words (neither of these came to fruition by the way). The third is a sketch I actually handed off to someone in the exhibits shop to build -- a dropbox to collect sketches from visitors at the museum's bird feeders during this program -- and even though it is very simple, it contained just enough detail to build it. 




Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment
Click here to view the attachment

Quote    Reply   
Remove this ad
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help