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#21 [url]

Nov 30 12 4:11 PM



 

@leinawea:

It's great that you're already identifying things you want to look at more closely next time. I had a chance to count birds for the first time today -- as a novice birder, I couldn't manage to count and sketch at the same time yet, but I did make a bunch of mental notes about types of birds and features I want to pay closer attention to next time I'm out to sketch. Cardinals are one of my favorites so far -- I'll try to pay closer attention to their heads when lowered in profile next time, and look forward to seeing other sketches of Cardinals from you too. :) 

Also keep in mind, there is no right or wrong sketch -- this is not about the product, but rather the process, so anything goes! 

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#22 [url]

Nov 30 12 8:27 PM

Wow, awesome sketches!  I love your little wren leinawea!  You caught the body posture really well!  Fred, I'd recognize your AMGO and ECDO anywhere!


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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#23 [url]

Dec 1 12 1:40 PM

I am playing catch up after being away for month.  I did sketch yesterday while doing my bird count.  I did from memory after i warmed up with lines and circles.  then today I did from a photo in magazine.  Will ask my kids if they have any chalk or cole they left behind.  Try some different supplies.  Ginny H. 


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Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#24 [url]

Dec 1 12 1:44 PM

I tried to scan on house computer which was not talking to scanner.  :)  So Al took a photo with his I phone and sent it to my email.  But it is small and i can not make larger.  All others are bigger size.  How are we doing it so the bigger size is working ???  Ginny H. 

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#25 [url]

Dec 1 12 1:58 PM

You might be able to get a bigger image if you take a picture with the digital camera you use for your birds, Ginny.  Just edit and download it as you would any other picture. 


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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#26 [url]

Dec 1 12 4:48 PM

I did my first sketches while I was counting today. I was trying to get the general shape and some portions of color patterns that I could see as they flittered in and out of my count site. This page includes some Titmice, Chickadees, Cardinals, Sparrows, a Wren, and a Downy Woodpecker.


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Small backyard near Chesapeake Bay deciduous trees, shrubs, brush piles 4 feeders (BOSS, Nyjer, peanuts, fruit/nut/seed mixture) and suet 2 birdbaths (1 heated)

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#27 [url]

Dec 2 12 2:38 PM

 
As a novice birder, it's amazing for me to see how fredz, hazelrunmama, maryf and others are able to quickly identify birds from what sometimes seem like quick outlines (to my inexperienced eyes). I'm wondering what aspects of birds you experts find yourself focusing on as you draw to convey a dove vs a wren vs a titmouse, and what you're picking out of from others' sketches that helps you identify what bird a sketch is representing. @Fredz, do you remember what you were focusing on when you sketched your dove?  And @Maryf and @hazelrunmama, what in Fredz's drawing made you know it was a Eurasian Collared Dove? What about with his titmouse sketch?

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fredz

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#28 [url]

Dec 2 12 3:08 PM



Julia,
 The Eurasian Collard-dove is a rare species here in Mich. When I reported it to ebird a reviewer from MSU asked questions to have the sighting confirmed. There were certain field markers that I had to provide. In this case it was the under side of the tail that was needed to confirm the purity of the species as they cross breed with escaped domestic turtle doves. Anyway, when I did the drawing from memory I incorporated the field markers. The darker undertail pattern and the neck ring along with the basic shape of a dove.

 Oh yes, forget about that expert stuff. I'm just like all the others; a student of our area wildlife trying to learning :}

Rural South Central Michigan s639.photobucket.com/albums/uu111/ftzilch/ Updated 4/18/11

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#29 [url]

Dec 2 12 8:37 PM

Julia, for me, it's the same from sketches as it is in the field--a combination of body shape and field marks.  General impression and shape is very important in IDs.  For instance, body profiles are very telling--look at the difference between the body shape of a nuthatch and a chickadee.  The nuthatch is weight-forward...the chickadee is chubby with a more upright posture. General impression can also include certain behaviors in the field which, of course, the sketch can only hint at--perhaps a double-leg scratch during foraging as opposed to a single-leg scratch. 

Shape is a biggie, too.  Male Blue jays, Tufted titmice and Northern cardinals all have crests, but the male cardinal has a black mask surrounding the bill; the titmouse has a dark mark above the bill and between the eyes, and the bluejay has black along the top of the bill connecting to a thin eyeline that extends back to connect in turn to the black along the crest.  The patterns are very distinctive.  So a sketch with a crest and one of those patterns is easy to identify! 
 

Hence my goal to get good/quick enough to capture the essence of an unknown bird in body shape/posture and still have time to note enough field marks to be able to make the ID later... 

As for Fred's sketches, his dove has a classic dove shape to it and combined with the neck ring and the patterned undertail coverts, it becomes a Eurasian collared-dove!  The titmouse has the crest, big eyes, and sort of a classic erect posture that screams 'titmouse'.  Fred's later comment about the Black-crested titmouse from TX reflects on the pale face and lack of black spot between the eyes, field marks for that titmouse, instead of the Tufted titmouse we have here.


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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#30 [url]

Dec 4 12 7:08 PM



That's a lot of information to get into a sketch - which makes me understand why a lot of field sketchers annotate their sketches. I suppose how you sketch does depend on whether you're drawing to record a bird you can ID easily, or drawing to ID the bird later, like hazelrunmama, or provide evidence that yes, in fact, this is the bird you saw, like fredz. With so much info to cover in the short time a bird is around, what're the most basic lines that would convey that info, and would still make a good sketch? Looking at jameswilson's sketches (which look great, thanks for posting!), can other sketchers recognize the birds, even though they're quick outlines? Just sitting here pondering what qualities make a sketch "good" for the purposes of bird watching. Please feel free to weigh in if you have any ideas!

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#31 [url]

Dec 6 12 12:37 PM

Tried to sketch the feeders in the yard. Distracted by the flock (70+) of Pine Siskins with a couple of American Goldfinches and a lone Common Redpoll. Here are my feeders. I hope the attachment works.  I am in St. Paul, MN with oak, cottonwood and poplar trees in the backyard.


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palbin in St. Paul, MN

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#32 [url]

Dec 6 12 4:54 PM

Ooooo, I like your heated deck bath, palbin!! 


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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lyn

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#33 [url]

Dec 9 12 11:03 AM

Seeing and then sketching the birds and their surroundings.......While watching the chickadees come and go from the feeders this morning I appreciated the value of being able to quickly sketch the feeders and habitat...


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Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

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#34 [url]

Dec 10 12 11:40 AM




Welcome @Lyn and @palbin! It is great to see the feeders attracting the birds in all your sketches. Keep in mind though, one of the ideas behind Feedersketches is to capture everything you see at your feeder, including birds.  @palbin, next time those pine siskins drop by, feel free to include them! 

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#35 [url]

Dec 15 12 12:02 AM

This is the very first thing I did. I then read over the other activity descriptions and moved to them. My sad little feeder sketches! The birds just moved so quickly and then I had trouble trying to determine what to focus on when sketching. I think someone asked why there were so many chickadees being drawn and I would guess it's because they have relatively easy field marks to sketch out quickly and they stay for more than a few seconds at a time! I did learn that I need to pay more attention to eyes, beaks, legs and feet!


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In Ashland, OH. No feeders (boo starlings and house sparrows) but near a small creek, nice mix of trees in area but hardly any flowering plants. Most gardens decorated with shrubs.

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#37 [url]

Dec 16 12 2:13 PM

My dogs do but they are more squirrel watching .  lol ginny H.  

Ocean Co. South NJ Walled patio 10 Crape Myrtle, Pine forest and bushes oak cherry lawn pond. one seed feeder, one suet, 4 hummingbird feeders, one sock.

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#38 [url]

Dec 16 12 9:20 PM

I love the view out your window, Margaret!  I think Littlest does, too!  Great sketch!


West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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#39 [url]

Dec 17 12 1:16 PM

More sketches from the feeder area this morning, some blind, some not.  I'm having trouble sticking to one exercise on one page--I'll be doing blind sketches and then a bird will land close and I'll want to capture it's shape/posture, then another will land close and I can't resist doing the head/bill.  o.o  Maybe I should cut back on the coffee.... 


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West central WI in a large tract of county forest with a 20-acre woodland wetland just to the south. 
BOSS, sunflower hearts, nyjer, suet, dried meal worms (all year); nectar and grape jelly (spring thru fall).

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lyn

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#40 [url]

Dec 17 12 4:18 PM

Today is the second count day and I got all set up in front of the window to sketch and count. There were snow flurries and a soft grey sky and few visitors. I was reconciled to drawing the red squirrel and rock pigeons......then a flock of bohemian waxwings flew into the trees across the street....the limit of my count area. Time to change focus and sketch quickly....easier thought than done !!! I  sketched in pencil, first drawing silhouettes (the birds were backlit), then used the binoculars for larger figures. My hand wouldn't process as quickly as my brain. I think another time I will use watercolor for a silhouette sketch from memory.

Then a pair of house finches arrived in the lilac bush and again I tried to sketch quickly, and with colored pencil.




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Suburban yard with trees & shrubs, New Brunswick, Canada

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